Campus Housing

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Campus Housing

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3 College Freshman

Campus Housing: lots of incoming students= limited housing. they make you meet people around you though

3 College Sophomore

Campus Housing: Getting assigned a compatable roommate is a joke

4 College Sophomore

Campus Housing: Its great but expensive to live on campus. They have Living and Learning communities where you can meet similar individuals. The dorms have all the necessary amenities and you can get to class fairly easily if you know the shortcuts.

3 College Sophomore

Campus Housing: I would apply for campus housing as early as possible if you have your heart set on a certain dorm--even if you might end up attending a different university. As far as dorms go, 17th Ave is the best. It is the newest, has the nest amenities, and has the best dining hall. However, it tends to be full of athletes and people in the Greek community so it is up to you to determine if you are comfortable with that. There are also great parties there.

Territorial Hall is another great dorm because it is on the Super Block and extremely social, which is perfect for freshmen.

Bailey Hall is not as bad as many people may think. Yes, it is secluded in St. Paul but the campus connectors are very easy to figure out. St. Paul is also a beautiful, quiet campus that makes studying and relaxing very easy. It can be nice to have the option to party in Minneapolis and then have a place to escape all the chaos if necessary.

4 College Sophomore

Campus Housing: While my room was not that impressive, every other part of living on campus was great. The amenities for living in a dorm weren't bad, and the dining hall was nearby. The social aspect of dorm life was probably the most important benefit. There were so many other kids that had the same interests as me who lived nearby.

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Student Author OverviewWhat's this?

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Living in dorms freshman year is the best way to meet new people and make friends. Every floor becomes a close-knit community. Freshmen prefer to live on the "Superblock," four dorms in adjacent blocks in East Bank. This is the hub of campus housing activities. Territorial (T-Hall) and Frontier halls are the two freshmen-only dorms, and thus, most popular among newcomers so they can meet with fellow classmates and make good friends. T-Hall is the designated party dorm full of drunk people on the weekends. Bailey Hall is the least preferred hall because it is in St. Paul, which is about a 20-minute Campus Connector ride to get to East Bank. St. Paul is a smaller campus and primarily hosts classes only for College of Design (CDes) and College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Science (CFANS) students. Thus, living in Bailey is inconvenient for most people. Regardless, the dorm itself has a great sense of community and provides great resources. The campus is also beautiful.

Campus housing provides a great living experience without the hassle of maintenance issues, with the amenities offered being substantial. Most basic needs are taken care of, and a student can check out additional materials at the front desk. Halls get cleaned every day, but weekend parties often create a chaotic mess. Work order forms can be filled at the front desk if students are in need of repairs in their rooms. Dorms are relatively close to most classes, and there is always the Campus Connector, which runs frequently. The meal plan is the only downside of living in the dorms. It is expensive and often not worth the money. Living in campus apartments allows students to be a part of campus residential life without the hassle of a meal plan. Here, a student gets to meet people with common interests, make connections, and try living on his or her own, managing time and money.

Facts & Statistics

On-Campus Housing Available?
Yes
Campus Housing Capacity
6,930
Average Housing Costs
$4,730
Types of Housing Offered
  • Apartments for married students
  • Apartments for single students
  • Coed dorms
  • Cooperative housing
  • Fraternity/sorority housing
  • Special housing for disabled students
  • Special housing for international students
Undergrads Living On Campus
21%
Freshmen Living On Campus
86%
Number of Dormitories
8
Number of Campus-Owned Apartments
3
Best Freshman Dorms
  • Frontier Hall
  • Pioneer Hall
  • Territorial Hall
Best Upperclassman Dorms
  • Comstock Hall
  • Middlebrook Hall
  • Sanford Hall
  • University Village
Worst Freshman Dorms
Bailey Hall
Worst Upperclassman Dorms
Centennial Hall
Best Dorms
  • Centennial Hall
  • Frontier Hall
  • Middlebrook Hall
  • Pioneer Hall
  • Sanford Hall
  • Territorial Hall
Worst Dorms
  • Bailey Hall
  • Comstock Hall
What You Get
  • Bed/mattress pad
  • Carpet
  • Closet
  • Desk and chair
  • Dresser/vanity
  • Ethernet connection
  • Phone jack
  • Smoke detector
  • TV connection
  • Wireless Internet
Also Available
  • All residence halls have a community council, which is a student-run organization that consists of an executive board and group of committee chairs that plan and implement programs and events throughout the year. Various committees specialize in areas dealing with philanthropy, diversity, and dorm improvements. Along with committee chairs, students have the opportunity to serve as historian, secretary, and treasurer.
  • Dorms often host peer tutoring options and SMART learning commons for students.
  • Living Learning Communities are specific communities in dorms that bring about people with same career interests to live on the same floor.
  • Sanford is generally known as the athletics dorm.
  • The Commonwealth Terrace Cooperative (CTC) offers U of M students with families affordable housing.
Available for Rent
Bed lofts, mini-fridges, and microwaves can be rented on a semester/yearly basis. DVDs, a DVD player, a vacuum cleaner, kitchen supplies, recreational sports equipment, board games, and a few other amenities can be checked out from the residence hall front desk at no cost.
Did You Know?
Sanford, Middlebrook, and Centennial halls have convenience stores containing everyday items such as food, drinks, and bathroom supplies.

DormitoriesWhat's This?

Bailey Hall
Floors: 5
Number of Occupants: 500-749
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen and upperclassmen
Room Types: Doubles, suites (doubles)
Special Features: Bailey Hall houses its own dining hall and is connected to the St. Paul Student Center and the Magrath Library through the Gopher tunnel system. Bailey Hall houses Rock Bottom, which is a community and social space with a big-screen TV and dance floor used for hall events, game days, or movie nights.
Centennial Hall
Floors: 7
Number of Occupants: 500-749
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen and upperclassmen
Room Types: Singles, doubles, suites (triples)
Special Features: Centennial has art deco designs and is one of four halls located on the "Superblock." Centennial Hall is shared with Territorial Hall, linked by a tunnel.
Comstock Hall
Floors: 6
Number of Occupants: 500-749
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Upperclassmen
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples
Special Features: Close to Coffman Memorial Union and the Weisman Art Museum, this hall has a game room, study lounges, and DVD rentals, plus a ballroom dance floor on its lower floor.
Frontier Hall
Floors: 5
Number of Occupants: 500-749
Bathrooms: Communal, suite
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen
Room Types: Doubles, suites (doubles)
Special Features: This hall features a dining hall and is a part of the "Superblock." It's also close to the Stadium Village.
Middlebrook Hall
Floors: 12
Number of Occupants: 750-999
Bathrooms: Communal, suite
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen and upperclassmen
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples, suites (doubles)
Special Features: It is the only residence hall located on the West Bank of the Minneapolis campus. It is near downtown Minneapolis and the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, home of the Minnesota Vikings.
Pioneer Hall
Floors: 5
Number of Occupants: 500-749
Bathrooms: Communal, suite
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen and upperclassmen
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples, suites (singles, doubles)
Special Features: Featuring Colonial architecture, Pioneer is close to Williams and Mariucci arenas, the hospital, the sports pavilion, rec center, and Stadium Village.
Sanford Hall
Floors: 9
Number of Occupants: 500-749
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen and upperclassmen
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples
Special Features: Located near Dinkytown, Sanford features a dining hall within the building and Colonial architecture that provides a variety of room styles.
Territorial Hall
Floors: 4
Number of Occupants: 500-749
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen
Room Types: Doubles
Special Features: Territorial is the most popular freshmen-only dorm. It is the "party dorm" for freshmen. Located in the "Superblock," T-Hall shares its dining hall with Centennial Hall, which is connected through tunnels. Pioneer Dining Hall can also be used for this purpose. It has all other amenities that every residence hall offers such as study lounges, game room, vending machine, front desk, etc.

Campus-Owned ApartmentsWhat's This?

Mark G. Yudof Hall
Floors: 7
Number of Units: 100-249
Bathrooms: Private
Coed: Yes
Residents: Upperclassmen
Room Types: Studios, one- and two-bedroom apartments (singles, doubles)
Special Features: Situated right behind Coffman Memorial and by the East River Flats, Yudof has a great location, and many students use Comstock dining services.
Yudof has all of the amenities offered by a residence hall in addition to a fitness center and indoor parking facilities.
Roy Wilkins Hall
Floors: 4
Number of Units: 100-249
Bathrooms: Private
Coed: Yes
Residents: Upperclassmen
Room Types: Studios, one- and two-bedroom apartments (singles, doubles)
Special Features: All apartments come with furniture, air conditioning, Ethernet access, cable TV service, and carpeting.
This hall was the first apartment-style complex for U of M students.
University Village
Floors: 3
Number of Units: 100-249
Bathrooms: Private
Coed: Yes
Residents: Upperclassmen
Room Types: One-, two-, and four-bedroom apartments (singles, doubles)
Special Features: Units include air conditioning, carpeting, full kitchen, furnished living areas, washer and dryer; live-in staff who develop social, recreational, cultural, and educational programs for the residents
Known as "UV," it has all of the amenities offered by a residence hall in addition to a fitness center and indoor parking facilities.

Student Polls

Rate campus housing on the following subjects    Based on 379 responses

Very poor
Excellent
  • Overall building quality
  • Amenities/perks
  • Cleanliness
  • Ease of housing process/lottery system
  • Proximity to classes
  • Resident community
  • Social atmosphere
  • Spaciousness
  • Appropriate level of rule enforcement
  • Value

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