Campus Housing

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Campus Housing

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5 College Sophomore

Campus Housing: Campus housing at Mount Holyoke can be best described as an endless sleepover. Being at an all women's college such as Mount Holyoke does have its perks! Imagine having a spacious room with hardwood floors and a rustic feel. Not to mention the walk-in closets and full length mirrors on every floor, it's every girls dream. Every floor has its own kitchen space with a sink and microwave, maybe even a stove! Almost every dorm (except a select few), has a dining hall right downstairs! Imagine waking up and not wanting to change from your pjs to grab some breakfast, well then just go downstairs and have a wide range of selections to choose from. Let's not forget the amazing roommate policy where each person is matched together by hand by a professional who sits at a coffee shop and reviews EVERYONE'S extensive surveys that are filled out to match the best candidates together as roommates. They have a 99% success rate and for those that do wish to change their roommate are just looking for a single room to themselves. Singles and suites are available to upperclassmen and are given out by first come-first served basis. Housing costs and food are both included in room and board which isn't that bad considering you get 3 meals a day PLUS spending money for snacks and etc.

1 person found this useful Report
2 College Sophomore

Campus Housing: Dorms are more than 100 years old, poorly maintained and not well-heated. During winter, icy layers will be seen glazing over windows in dorm rooms, making it impossibly cold to live in; what's more ridiculous is that even under these circumstances, personal heaters are not allowed. The only good dorm is Creighton, the newest dorm (built in 2008).

4 College Senior

Campus Housing: for maximum integration into the school community, living on campus would be a great step towards achieving that goal

4 College Freshman

Campus Housing: The campus is beautiful! It was designed by the same guy who designed central park.

5 College Freshman

Campus Housing: The majority of students (93%) live on campus, and that is fine because Mount Holyoke's campus is so beautiful! There are lots of different dorm options to choose from: near to the center of campus or farther away, dorms with dining halls attached or ones with kitchens that students can cook their own food in. There are beautiful old dorms that were built in the 1800s and newer ones with more modern amenities. There is a quiet dorm, several substance-free floors, some language floors and a couple floors dedicated to living-learning communities. You can choose a dorm that is close to academic buildings, close to the Green, close to dining halls, close to the lake, close to the gym, or close to the Village Commons, depending on your preference.

1 person found this useful Report
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Student Author OverviewWhat's this?

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It’s worth noting that Mount Holyoke is said to have “dorms like palaces.” While there are some dorms that are perpetually last to be chosen, you’re never going to find yourself living in a converted closet. Most rooms are spacious enough, especially since the New Dorm was built, alleviating a housing crunch. All dorms offer common rooms, computer labs, kitchens (if there isn’t a dining hall), and both single-sex and unisex bathrooms. There are many beautiful dorms on campus and many older ones that have their unique charms. Many students opt for a dorm “on the Green” in the center of campus for convenience, but there are also students who are adamant about living on the edges of campus because of the feeling of “getting away from it all.” Students generally base their choice of dorm on personal preference, although the word is that Prospect and 1837 are to be avoided if possible.

This is a very residential campus, with nearly all students living on campus or in college-owned apartments a few minutes away. You work here, you play here, and you live here, which is undoubtedly one of the contributing factors to the strong sense of community you will find at MHC. All class years live in each dorm, except for Pearsons Annex and Dickinson Hall, providing opportunities for inter-class friendships. There is a friendly competition between dorms, especially during Disorientation, a tradition that occurs every fall and serves to unite first years and seniors through a series of dorm pride and “initiation” events. Seniors devise activities for “their” first years to do, such as steal another dorm’s banner or give a performance during dinner. Don’t worry though—hazing is prohibited.

 

Facts & Statistics

On-Campus Housing Available?
Yes
Campus Housing Capacity
2,195
Average Housing Costs
$5,940
Freshmen Required to Live on Campus?
Yes
Undergrads Living On Campus
94%
Number of Dormitories
19
Number of Campus-Owned Apartments
3
Best Dorms
  • Mead
  • New Dorm
  • Safford
  • Wilder
Worst Dorms
  • 1837
  • Prospect
What You Get
  • Bed
  • Bookcase
  • Desk and chair
  • Dresser
  • Ethernet connection
  • Mirror
  • Phone jack
  • Window coverings
Also Available
The College owns a few off-campus apartments, which require an application process to get into. They are located at 3 Park Street, 24 Silver Street, and 17 Morgan Street.
Available for Rent
MicroFridge (minifridge with microwave), but only in dorms where this will not blow a fuse!
Did You Know?
  • Most residence hall rooms are singles or doubles. There are also some triples and a few quads, and a small number of suites (a combination of singles and doubles in an enclosed area, with a shared private bathroom). Single rooms are reserved for juniors and seniors, with some available to sophomores who enter the singles lottery, which takes place towards the beginning of the school year. On-campus apartments, within residence halls, are also available to groups of three or four upperclasswomen. These include their own bathroom and kitchen facilities, plus at least two bedroom/living areas.
  • Students have room keys (and sometimes closet keys) but no dorm keys! Why? To get into a dorm, you need to swipe your OneCard in the card reader outside the door.
  • Seniors are guaranteed singles.
  • North Mandelle Hall and Abbey Hall each have one floor designated as a quiet floor, which means that, in general, people are expected to keep their noise out of the hallways to a greater extent than is necessary on other floors. To get a room on a quiet floor, you must sign into the floor on dorm-choosing night.
  • All residence halls are smoke-free and handicapped accessible.
  • Why are there so many apartments within residence halls? These are the former HR (Head Resident) apartments. Each dorm had an HR, an adult who lived in the dorm and made sure things didn't get too wild. When this position was eliminated, the apartments were opened up to students.
  • Students are big participants in Residential Life. Each floor has a Student Advisor and each dorm has a hall president; their jobs are to act as liaisons between students and Residence Life. They also plan floor and hall activities and are a valuable source of advice for first-year students.

DormitoriesWhat's This?

1837 Hall
Floors: 5 plus Basement
Number of Occupants: 140
Bathrooms: Shared by 24 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 49 singles, 45 doubles, 1 apartment
Special Features: Most of the singles in this dorm are conjoined singles, meaning that there is a door in the wall between each pair (which can be kept locked if desired). It's like living in a double and a single at the same time. This dorm was named after the year that Mary Lyon founded Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, which later became the College.
Abbey Hall
Floors: 3 plus basement
Number of Occupants: 94
Bathrooms: Shared by 26 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 52 singles, 12 doubles, 4 triples, 1 quad, 1 apartment
Special Features: Quiet floor, FP (Frances Perkins scholars) housing.
Brigham Hall
Floors: 4 plus basement
Number of Occupants: 85
Bathrooms: Shared by 19 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 33 singles, 20 doubles, 3 triples, 1 apartment
Special Features: FP housing. This is the oldest dorm on campus, being the first one built after fire destroyed the original Seminary building in 1897.
Buckland Hall
Floors: 5 plus Basement
Number of Occupants: 120
Bathrooms: Shared by 24 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 39 singles, 39 doubles, 1 triple
Special Features: FP (Frances Perkins scholars) housing. This dorm was named for Buckland, Massachusetts, the birthplace of Mary Lyon (founder of Mount Holyoke).
Dickinson Hall
Floors: 3
Number of Occupants: 56
Bathrooms: Shared by 11 residents
Residents: Sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 22 singles, 17 doubles
Special Features: There is a full kitchen on each floor, plus one larger kitchen on the first floor. This dorm was renovated in 2001. Prior to the fall of that year, it was housing for FPs. It is the smallest dorm on campus, and one of three located across the street from the main campus.
Ham Hall
Floors: 6 plus basement
Number of Occupants: 157
Bathrooms: Shared by 21 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 62 singles, 36 doubles, 5 quads, 1 apartment
Special Features: Special Features: Balcony on each floor, conjoined singles. This is the foreign language hall, housing foreign fellows and hosting foreign language tables. Foreign language tables meet once a week over a meal, and provide an opportunity for students to practice speaking the language.
MacGregor Hall
Floors: 5
Number of Occupants: 132
Bathrooms: Shared by 30 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 24 singles, 48 doubles, 4 triples
Special Features: Special Features: Each room has a bay window (with a view of Upper Lake, if you're lucky enough to be on that side of the building) and a window seat. Each floor has a balcony. This dorm is built on a hill. In the winter, there is sometimes a thin sheet of ice on this hill, and you can slide down it (intentionally or unintentionally!) on your way to class.
Mead Hall
Floors: 4 plus basement
Number of Occupants: 135
Bathrooms: Shared by 26 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 34 singles, 40 doubles, 6 triples, 1 apartment
Special Features: This dorm was named for Elizabeth Mead, president of the College from 1890-1900.
North Mandelle Hall
Floors: 4 plus basement
Number of Occupants: 105
Bathrooms: Shared by 20 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 68 singles, 14 doubles, 1 triple, 1 apartment, 2 suites
Special Features: Connected to South Mandelle, FP housing, quiet floor, sunroom. The building that houses North and South Mandelle was originally called Hillside (after the large hill it is situated on and that continues on behind it) but was renamed in 1930.
North Rockefeller Hall
Floors: 4 plus basement
Number of Occupants: 94
Bathrooms: Shared by approximately 19 residents
Room Types: 38 singles, 16 doubles, 7 triples, 1 apartment
Special Features: Connected to South Rockefeller, houses a sunroom.
Pearsons Annex
Floors: 2
Number of Occupants: 12
Bathrooms: Shared by 4 residents
Residents: FPs (exclusively)
Room Types: 12 singles
Special Features: Full kitchen
Pearsons Hall
Floors: 4 plus Basement
Number of Occupants: 136
Bathrooms: Shared by 17 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 28 singles, 52 doubles, 3 triples
Special Features: Renovated in 2000, this is the largest dorm on campus, and one of three across the street from the main campus. The basement is said to be haunted.
Porter Hall
Floors: 4 plus Basement
Number of Occupants: 100
Bathrooms: Shared by 14 residents
Residents: First-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors
Room Types: 24 singles, 29 doubles, 6 triples
Special Features: The first floor houses office space for the Speaking, Arguing, and Writing Program (SAW) and the Weissman Center for Leadership. Named after Deacon Porter, a trustee of the College from 1836 to 1877, and one of Mary Lyon's good friends.
Prospect Hall
Floors: 5
Number of Occupants: 144
Bathrooms: Shared by 27 residents
Room Types: 48 singles, 48 doubles
Special Features: This is typically the least coveted dorm; although many of its rooms have great views of Lower Lake, it feels like a concrete box inside. Stories abound of how it was originally meant as a temporary dorm, and then wound up staying.
Safford Hall
Floors: 3
Number of Occupants: 72
Bathrooms: Shared by 22 residents
Room Types: 18 singles, 27 doubles
Special Features: This hall is the second oldest residence hall on campus (after Brigham).
South Mandelle Hall
Floors: 4
Number of Occupants: 90
Bathrooms: Shared by 28 residents
Room Types: 51 singles, 15 doubles, 1 apartment, 1 suite
Special Features: Connected to North Mandell, houses a sunroom.
South Rockefeller Hall
Floors: 4 plus basement
Number of Occupants: 89
Bathrooms: Shared by approximately 18 residents
Room Types: 40 singles, 8 doubles, 10 triples, 1 apartment
Special Features: Connected to North Rockefeller, houses a sunroom.
Torrey Hall
Floors: 4 plus mezzanine
Number of Occupants: 126
Bathrooms: Shared by 23 residents
Room Types: 43 singles, 38 doubles, 1 quad, 1 apartment
Special Features: A lot of athletes live here, as this is the closest dorm to Kendall Sports and Dance Complex.
Wilder Hall
Floors: 4
Number of Occupants: 100
Bathrooms: Shared by 25 residents
Room Types: 22 singles, 38 doubles, 1 apartment
Special Features: The Golden Pear dining area, available to all students by reservation, is located on the first floor.

Campus-Owned ApartmentsWhat's This?

17 Morgan Street
Special Features: Application process required
24 Silver Street
Special Features: Application process required
3 Park Street
Special Features: Application process required

Student Polls

Rate campus housing on the following subjects    Based on 65 responses

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  • Overall building quality
  • Amenities/perks
  • Cleanliness
  • Ease of housing process/lottery system
  • Proximity to classes
  • Resident community
  • Social atmosphere
  • Spaciousness
  • Appropriate level of rule enforcement
  • Value

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