Cornell University

1,697 reviews
  1. Ithaca, NY
  2. 4 Year
A+
Overall Niche Grade
  1. Academics
    A+
  2. Value
    A+
  3. Diversity
    A+
  4. Campus
    B+
  5. Athletics
    B
  6. Party Scene
    A-
  7. Professors
    A+
  8. Location
    B+
  9. Dorms
    C+
  10. Campus Food
    A+
  11. Student Life
    A-
  12. Safety
    B-
Cornell University is ...
Private not-for-profit
Athletic Division
NCAA Division I-AA
Athletic Conference
Ivy Group
Address
300 Day Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853

Cornell University Rankings

Niche rankings are based on rigorous analysis of key statistics from the U.S. Department of Education and millions of reviews.

Admissions

Acceptance Rate
14%
SAT Range
1330-1510
ACT Range
30-34
Application Fee
$80
SAT/ACT
Required
High School GPA
Required
Application Website

Cost

Net Price
$28,537/ year
National
$15,431

Average cost after financial aid for students receiving grant or scholarship aid, as reported by the college.

Net Price by Household Income
  • <$30k
    $11,665/ year
  • $30-48k
    $10,440/ year
  • $49-75k
    $18,560/ year
  • $76-110k
    $26,486/ year
  • $110k+
    $44,820/ year

Academics

Professors
A+
Based on faculty accomplishments, salary, student reviews, and additional factors.
Student Faculty Ratio
9:1
Evening Degree Programs
No
82%
of students agree that professors put a lot of effort into teaching their classes.119 responses
63%
of students agree that it is easy to get the classes they want.126 responses
33%
of students agree that the workload is easy to manage.125 responses

Majors

Students

Full-Time Enrollment
14,269Undergrads
Undergrads Over 25
1%
Pell Grant
15%
Varsity Athletes
8%
Poll
What one word or phrase best describes the typical student at this school?
Based on 81 responses
Report
  • Smart, hard working, and stressed
    49%
  • Work hard, play hard
    14%
  • Egotistical assholes
    12%
  • Intelligent, but self absorbed
    9%
  • Stressed
    6%
  • Busy
    5%
  • Smart & stressed
    5%

Campus Life

Freshmen Live On-Campus
100%
Poll
61%
of students say that Greek life is pretty big.140 responses
Poll
72%
of students say varsity sporting events are attended, but not a huge part of campus life.160 responses
Poll
What one word or phrase best describes your school?
Based on 87 responses
Report
  • Any person, any study
    46%
  • Endless possibilities
    14%
  • Work hard, play hard
    13%
  • Legacies and Trust-fund babies
    10%
  • Work hard, play later
    10%
  • Bureaucratic and frustrating!
    5%
  • Okay
    1%

After Cornell University

Median Earnings 6 Years After Graduation
$70,900/ year
National
$33,028
Graduation Rate
93%
National
47%
Employed 2 Years After Graduation
92%
National
83%
82%
of students feel confident they will find a job in their field after graduation.78 responses

Reviews

1,697 reviews
  • Excellent
    325
  • Very Good
    639
  • Average
    582
  • Poor
    104
  • Terrible
    47
I had an indifferent viewpoint toward Greek life, but now I despise it. Note this review ONLY applies to social Greek life and is my OPINION.

Greek life adds very little to Cornell. The philanthropy they carry out is often for publicity stunts, and they do very little philanthropy and volunteering. The students very rarely care much about academics and are only concerned about sliding by classes with good grades and getting good jobs. Greek life is cultish and cliquey, and I find that if you're not part of Greek life, you may be able to get into parties, but you'll generally be excluded from the Greek community as a whole. And even the social scene they offer is very limited and almost always revolves around alcohol. I'm sorry, but wine tours? How is that fun!?! Because you go and get blasted out of your minds! Although Greek life states that it exists for academics, philanthropy, and fraternity, I, as stated above, find that it's the complete opposite.

The worst part about the issue with Greek life is that it seems that the administration ignores the woes of Greek life because students in Greek life will end up being the most generous donors to Cornell after they graduate. Yes, I've said it: The reason why I think the administration is often lenient (note: NOT always lenient, especially with regard to hazing, thank the Lord) toward Greek life is because Greek life becomes a symbol of fraternity to Cornell students, which increases the likelihood that they'll enjoy their experience at Cornell and want to give back. So I think that the administration actually discriminates toward Greek organizations.

Additionally, what Greek life does do can be accomplished with through on-campus housing. Philanthropy? Look into the PSC (doubt many Greek life even know what it is). Fraternity? West Campus, although it may not be the best fit for many students, is plenty fraternal. Academics? Honors and preprofessional fraternities.

I'd say more, but no more space.
  • College Sophomore
  • Feb 16 2015
My experience at Cornell had been a whirlwind of endless opportunities. It has absolutely had it's ups and downs, with times where the stress and fast pace of classes seems to be unbearable, but usually when that happens a break was right around the corner and there was time to catch up. All the students at this school, from the engineers to the Hotelies, are used to being the top of their class in high school. It takes some getting used to learn that not everyone can be the best at this university.

That being said, Cornell can offer you the change to truly impact the world in whatever field you pursue. Your plant science degree with lead to cutting edge research, your business major with give you connections others need years to build and your engineering degree will give you your choice of career straight out of college. But that diploma does not come easy, you will have to work relentlessly for four years to earn it (five years if you're studying architecture!).

Looking back to choosing this university my senior year of high school, I wouldn't change a thing. My experience has been far from perfect: I've experienced failure just like the rest of my peers. I'm not, however, the same person I was in high school and this is a good thing. Cornell has changed me for the better and I highly recommend you let it do the same to you!
  • College Junior
  • 4 months ago
There is inequity in campus housing. The freshman dormitories are new and well-maintained, but even then, it depends on where you live. My freshman dormitory was good, but some dormitories, like Jameson, squeeze four students in one room.The Collegetown dormitories have very few amenities, and the community life is very poor. Overall, not great in terms of dormitories.

The housing process is a mess. After your freshman year, the likelihood of you getting a housing match that you want is truly up in the air. Good luck. Also, add in the fact that living off-campus is not at all managed by Cornell, which means that apartment landlords overcharge because demand for apartments is so high, and demand is so inelastic! Really, take whatever housing you get and cherish it, because unless you live in a fraternity or sorority in which you chose to live there, or you get lucky, you're sh*t out of luck.

Social life, as you can infer, depends on luck. You can get placed in a great dormitory with a resident advisor who involves and engages students and a great community culture, or you can get placed in a dormitory in which students don't talk to each other.

All in all, campus housing could be so much better, but the housing administration is not particularly competent.
  • College Sophomore
  • Feb 16 2015