Campus Housing

Location
San Francisco, CA
Undergrads
6,246
Tuition
$39,840
Admission Difficulty
Average
More statistics . . .
YesI'm interested, let this school know MaybeBookmark for later NoShow me better matches What does it mean to express interest?
Oops! There was an error.

Reload the page and try again.

Saving your interest We will attempt to notify this school of your interest. This school has been saved to your schools listyour schools list. This school has been removed from your recommended schools list.
For more schools, visit your recommended schools list.

Reviews

{{ error }}
close
1 College Freshman

Campus Housing: Campus housing is the worst. There is never any toilet paper in the stalls, the restrooms are not kept clean daily, there is no soap, and the staff is very rude for the price you pay.

3 College Freshman

Campus Housing: A bit strict but an experienced I liked nonetheless

2 College Freshman

Campus Housing: The only great thing about living on campus is the proximity to your classes and it's role in keeping everyone together and creating a great social atmosphere. Apart from that living on campus sucks.

1 person found this useful Report
4 College Sophomore

Campus Housing: You have a 50/50 shot at a million dollar view, bathrooms are cleaned frequently, access to computer lab, kitchen, lounges, and laundry in the building. There is a limit to how many overnight guests you can have per month (if they are from a different residence hall or are not students at USF). For guests that live in the same building as you, there is no limit.

1 person found this useful Report
3 College Freshman

Campus Housing: I attempted to switch dorms my freshman year and it was an absolute nightmare. If you get stuck somewhere that you don't like, expect the process to take months to fix. Housing department is very, very slow. But on campus housing is convenient, especially in a city like San Francisco where rent can be extremely high.

{{review.UserDisplayString}}

{{review.SectionLabel}} at {{review.EntityName}}:

{{review.Votes}} found this useful - Did you? Was this useful? Yes Report

Sorry, there are no reviews.

  • {{settings.pageNumber}} of {{settings.maxPages}}
  • Pages:
  • ... {{page}}

Rankings View more rankings . . .

  • 23rd
    Shortest Walk to Class
  • 390th
    Cleanest Dorms
  • 522nd
    Best Dorm Atmosphere
  • 1179th
    Most Spacious Dorms

Student Author OverviewWhat's This?

Jiordan Castle
Hometown
Huntington, New York
Major
English (Writing Emphasis)
Grad Year
2013
View all previous student authors

Living on campus is one of the most important experiences any college student can have. Many newcomers become friends with their roommates, floormates, and classmates as they bond over all-nighters, afternoon coffee breaks, even the long hike up the stairs to Lone Mountain. And as any on-campus resident can tell you, living on campus is the most convenient living situation a student can hope for. You’re just five minutes from class or the cafeteria at all times. At USF, freshmen are required to live on campus, unless they are current residents of San Francisco or the Bay Area. Since the vast majority of USF students is not from the area, the amount of underclassmen on campus is very high. There are two residence halls designated as freshmen-only, which is great for meeting people. USF is also home to many living-learning communities, which allow students to live with fellow classmates that have similar goals and interests.

There are many residence halls for sophomores and upperclassmen, so virtually anyone who wants the comfort and ease of living on campus can. In each residence hall, students benefit from a predictable room-and-board cost with all utilities included, engaging social activities, educational programs, and student leadership opportunities at the floor, hall, and campus-wide levels. The biggest complaint about campus housing at USF is the quality of the older dormitories, like Hayes-Healy, Gillson, Phelan, and Fromm. But by the time junior and senior years come around, students can always move off campus or live in upperclassman housing. Most students rave about the quality of life in Loyola Village because the buildings are newer, furnished, and in better condition than any apartment you’re likely to rent just out of college. Wherever you choose to live, know that campus living is a big part of the college experience.

Facts & Statistics

On-Campus Housing Available?
Yes
Campus Housing Capacity
2,189
Average Housing Costs
$8,490
Types of Housing Offered
  • Apartments for single students
  • Coed dorms
  • Special housing for disabled students
  • Women's dorms
Freshmen Required to Live on Campus?
Yes
Undergrads Living On Campus
38%
Freshmen Living On Campus
92%
Number of Dormitories
6
Number of Campus-Owned Apartments
2
Best Freshman Dorms
  • Hayes-Healy Hall
  • Phelan Hall
Best Upperclassman Dorms
  • Lone Mountain Hall
  • Loyola Village
Worst Freshman Dorms
  • Fromm Hall
  • Gillson Hall
Worst Upperclassman Dorms
  • Fromm Hall
  • Phelan Hall
What You Get
  • Bed (twin extra-long)
  • Bookshelf
  • Cable (but no TV)
  • Closet and/or dresser
  • Desk and chair
  • Desk lamp
  • Ethernet access
  • Free campus and local phone calls
  • Mirror
  • Window coverings
Also Available
  • All residence halls are non-smoking.
  • Each residence hall or dormitory contains at least one lounge, a kitchen, and laundry facilities. Every hall is secured with a 24-hour desk staff. Community programs and activities are planned by resident advisers, resident ministers, residence hall council, and Residence Hall Association.
Available for Rent
Microwaves Mini-refrigerators
Did You Know?
USF originally built Loyola Village to house faculty members and their families. Fortunately, it did not sell out, and the University converted the rest of the townhomes into excellent and convenient student housing.

DormitoriesWhat's This?

Fromm Hall
Floors: 5
Number of Occupants: 100-249
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: No, women only
Residents: Freshmen and sophomores
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples
Special Features: Three student lounges, communal kitchen, laundry room, cable TV connector in each room, flat-screen TVs in lounges, piano, special living option for all females: no male overnight guests for residents on the fifth floor
Gillson Hall
Floors: 8
Number of Occupants: 250-499
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples
Special Features: Cable TV connector in each room, two student lounges, communal kitchen, flat-screen TVs in lounges, foosball, piano, laundry room, wood-burning fireplace
Hayes-Healy Hall
Floors: 9
Number of Occupants: 250-499
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples
Special Features: Cable TV connector in each room, two student lounges, a communal kitchen, flat-screen TVs in lounges, pool table, pingpong table, piano, laundry room, wood-burning fireplace, the Martín-Baró Scholars living-learning community
Lone Mountain Hall
Floors: 7
Number of Occupants: 100-249
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen and sophomores
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples
Special Features: Four student lounges, two communal kitchens, laundry room, cable TV connector in each room, flat-screen TVs in lounges, piano, permanently lofted beds on second and third floors of Lone Mountain North
Pedro Arrupe Hall
Floors: 4
Number of Occupants: 100-249
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Upperclassmen
Room Types: Singles, doubles
Special Features: Two student lounges, communal kitchen, laundry room, cable TV connector in each room, flat-screen TVs with surround sound in lounge, gaming systems in lounge (Xbox 360, Wii), pool table, global residential community, one mile from campus
Phelan Hall
Floors: 6
Number of Occupants: 250-499
Bathrooms: Communal
Coed: Yes
Residents: Freshmen and sophomores
Room Types: Singles, doubles, triples
Special Features: Six student lounges, communal kitchen with refrigerator, laundry room, cable TV connector in each room, flat-screen TVs in lounges, pingpong table, the Esther Madriz Scholars living-learning community, the Saint Ignatius Institute (SII)

Campus-Owned ApartmentsWhat's This?

Fulton House
Floors: 2
Number of Units: <10
Bathrooms: Private
Coed: No, single sex (determined by year)
Residents: Freshmen and sophomores
Room Types: Apartment (singles, doubles, triples)
Special Features: Kitchen with refrigerator, stovetop, oven, and microwave, laundry room, cable TV connector in each room, flat-screen TV in main house living room, two floors in main house, one floor in cottage
Loyola Village
Floors: 4
Number of Units: 100-249
Bathrooms: Private
Coed: Yes
Residents: Upperclassmen
Room Types: One-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments (singles)
Special Features: Kitchen with refrigerator, oven, microwave, dishwasher, and garbage disposal, communal laundry room, cable TV connector in each room, and a fully furnished common area within the apartment (couches, tables, and an entertainment unit).
Loyola Village provides housing for students, faculty, and staff.

Student Polls

Rate campus housing on the following subjects    Based on 84 responses

Very poor
Excellent
  • Age of buildings
  • Amenities/perks
  • Cleanliness
  • Ease of housing process/lottery system
  • Proximity to classes
  • Resident community
  • Social atmosphere
  • Spaciousness
  • Strictness
  • Value

Videos

4
pageviews remaining

Non-registered users are limited to 5 school profile page views per month.

Register for free to gain full access!