Academics

Location
Baltimore, MD
Undergrads
5,866
Tuition
$43,390
Admission Difficulty
Very Hard
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Reviews

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4 College Freshman

Academics: I love our academics- challenging and fulfilling as an engineering student.

1 person found this useful Report
5 College Freshman

Academics: It's prestigious for a reason. Brilliant professor, TAs and peeps.

1 person found this useful Report
5 College Student

Academics: work load is difficult and writing sems is amazing, but not what the school is known for.

5 College Freshman

Academics: The academic experience here is great! There are tons of support options for those who need it. Very little grade inflation, but they want you to get the best grade that you can (and deserve).

3 Recent Alumnus

Academics: As a Molecular and Cellular Biology major (one of two BS degrees awarded by the School of Arts and Sciences), I found the workload to be very intense. All the required science classes were 200-350 people, leaving little room for interaction with the professor, and many professors made it obvious that they would rather be doing research than teaching (Hopkins is known for not funding teaching hours but requiring professors to take a certain number of them per semester anyway to retain connection with the school). The facilities became much more incredible with the construction of the new undergrad teaching labs, which I graduated before the completion of but have heard are amazing. It's fairly easy to obtain a position as a research assistant/tech during school, especially if you have federal work/study monies or would like to do research for credit; this can create connections that lead to a job after graduation. Most bio majors are pre-med (or at least, they were when they started at Hopkins).

2 people found this useful Report
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Rankings View more rankings . . .

  • 80th
    Smartest Professors
  • 94th
    Best Use of Teaching Assistants
  • 108th
    Best Course Variety
  • 136th
    Most Flexible Curriculums
  • 188th
    Best Registration Process

Student Author OverviewWhat's This?

Dan White
Hometown
Glen Rock, NJ
Major
International Studies and Economics
Grad Year
2012
View all previous student authors

Hopkins students are generally pleased with academics. If you ask JHU students what the deciding factor was for choosing Hopkins, the school’s strong academic reputation tops the list. The medical school is regarded as the best in the world, and other majors—such as engineering, economics, and international relations—are nationally recognized. Some students are cutthroat, but for the most part, JHU students are willing to lend a helping hand. Humanities/social science students have more control over their schedules, and their classes focus less on memorization and more on critical thinking. Engineering/science students complain that their classes are tougher, but this is definitely up for debate. The only universal complaint Hopkins students have about academics is that some teachers are unapproachable and are only interested in their personal research. Courses with teaching assistants are great because TAs are often more accessible than professors. The general belief is that teaching assistants have more interest in helping students learn than professors.

Academics at Hopkins would be stronger if there were greater camaraderie and individual attention in lower-level lecture courses. Students who need or want a lot of individual attention have to make the effort to meet the professor or teaching assistant outside of class. This is less true in small, upper-level seminar courses. Students also complain about the lack of grade inflation at Hopkins, which puts them at a disadvantage when compared with students who attend other top universities. This disadvantage is overpowered by the fact that Hopkins students have access to some of the best professors and researchers in the world. Hopkins provides ample opportunities for students to design independent studies and research. Overall, Hopkins is the perfect fit for hardworking individuals who have a thirst for knowledge.

Facts & Statistics

Student-Faculty Ratio
10:1
Full-Time Instructional Faculty
1,088
Part-Time Instructional Faculty
246
Total FT Faculty
3,985
Faculty with Terminal Degree
94%
Average Faculty Salary
$104,323
Full-Time Retention Rate
97%
Transfer-Out Rate
5%
Graduation Rate
92%
Programs/Majors Offered
122
Academic/Career Counseling?
Yes
Remedial Services?
No
Class Sizes
  • Fewer than 20 students: 68%
  • 20 to 49 Students: 21%
  • 50 or more students: 11%
Instructional Programs
Occupational: No
Academic: Yes
Continuing Professional: Yes
Recreational/Avocational: Yes
Adult Basic Remedial: No
Secondary (High School): No
Special Credit Opportunities
Advanced Placement (AP) Credits: Yes
Dual Credit: Yes
Life Experience Credits: No
Undergraduate Schools/Divisions
  • Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Carey Business School
  • Krieger School of Arts and Sciences
  • Peabody Institute
  • School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)
  • School of Education
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • Whiting School of Engineering
Degrees Awarded
  • Bachelor's degree
  • Certificate
  • Doctorate - Professional practice
  • Doctorate - Research/scholarship
  • Master's degree
  • Post-bachelor's certificate
  • Post-master's certificate
Most Popular Majors
  • Business/Commerce, General: 3%
  • International Relations and National Security Studies: 4%
  • Public Health Studies: 4%
  • Registered Nursing (RN): 2%
Graduation Requirements
  • English (including composition)
  • Humanities
  • Mathematics
  • Sciences (biological or physical)
  • Social science
Special Study Options
  • Study abroad
  • Teacher certification (below the postsecondary level)
  • Weekend/evening college
Other Academic Offerings
  • Accelerated program
  • Combined bachelor's/master's programs
  • Double major
  • Dual enrollment
  • Independent study
  • Internships
  • Student-designed major
Best Places to Study
  • AMR I study lounge
  • Charles Commons
  • Gilman Hall, in the atrium and reading room
  • Milton S. Eisenhower (MSE) Library
Tips to Succeed
  • Get involved right away. As a freshman, make sure you join as many student organizations as you can. Hopkins students are extremely motivated. The more student organizations you join, the quicker you will assimilate into college.
  • If a class is extremely difficult, go to your teaching assistant's office hours or even get a tutor. There are hundreds of people willing to give you extra help if you need it. Make sure you use all of the available resources.

Student Polls

Rate your school's academic environment on the following topics    Based on 44 responses

Very poor
Excellent
  • Academic advisers
  • Class availability
  • Consistency in grading
  • Course subject variety
  • Curriculum flexibility
  • Gen-Ed requirements
  • Manageability of workload
  • Online course options
  • Quality of teaching assistants (TAs)
  • Scheduling/registration process
  • Technology in the classroom

Rate your school's professors on the following topics    Based on 45 responses

Very poor
Excellent
  • Accessibility
  • Communication skills
  • General knowledge
  • Interest in class subjects
  • Interest in students
  • Time spent in classroom
  • Use of teaching assistants

Who are the most notable alumni from this school?    Based on 5 responses

  • 56% Michael Bloomberg - mayor of New York City
  • 22% Woodrow Wilson - 28th U.S. president
  • 11% John Astin - actor
  • 11% Wes Moore
  • 0% Wes Craven - horror film director
  • 0% John Barth - writer

Photos

4
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