Location
Baltimore, MD
Undergrads
5,866
Tuition
$43,390
Admission Difficulty
Very Hard
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Reviews 1135 total reviews with an average rating of 3.5

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Campus Dining: If I had to pick the worst part about school, it might be the food.

Niche User

Campus Dining: Personally, I love the food because I'm a junk food addict. We also have the healthy food for those other people.

Niche User

Campus Housing: AMRs were fun, but it's an experience I would never want to relive. Lack of air- conditioning and having to live with a roommate weren't fun. Dorms will never be that fabulous, but they're decent.

Niche User

Campus Housing: The AMRs are great for hanging out and getting to know people in your hall. Most people who live in the AMRs love it. Wolman is pretty good if you want air- conditioning and your own bathroom. It doesn't have a social atmosphere like the AMRs, but still has a good mix of freshman and sophomores, so it's friendly. Buildings A, B, and McCoy aren't that great because they have settings that don't facilitate sociality.

Niche User

Campus Housing: Live in the AMRs freshman year if you want an experience similar to that described in movies. It's really chill and so easy to meet people. You probably won't get a single, so try to find something in common with your roommate. Also, no matter where you live, bring decorations! The rooms are really bare and unattractive, otherwise.

Niche User

Campus Housing: What dorms are best depends on what you like. The AMRs are an intense, social, freshman experience. Wolman and McCoy have more privacy and amenities, but they can be a little isolating. Buildings A and B have the worst of both, and they're the most likely to be tripled when the dorms are overcrowded early in the year.

Niche User

Campus Housing: AMR II is especially bad. Ask for Wolman or McCoy first if you can, unless you don't mind being surrounded by freshmen.

Niche User

Campus Housing: The dorms vary greatly in quality. The AMRs are the typical freshman dorms. They're not nice, but they're very social. Buildings A and B are suite-style, and they're fairly nice. You share a bathroom with four people. Wolman and McCoy are suites, too, but they are nicer and have kitchenettes in each suite. They are less social, though, and house some sophomores. If you want a single room, you'll have to live in the AMRs or in Buildings A and B.

Niche User

Campus Housing: The dorms are typical of any college. I lived in the AMRs freshman year, which are the most social, although not as nice. They are typical double rooms on a hallway, with bathrooms down the halls. All dorms, except a few, are coed. The downfall of the AMRs is that there is no air-conditioning; however, fans in the fall and spring are more than sufficient. I would not have given up my AMR experience for anything, and would not have lived anywhere else. I met all of the friends that I have now in those dorms and had a great freshman year.

Niche User

Campus Housing: AMRs are much more social-better for your freshman year.

Niche User

Campus Housing: In Wolman and McCoy, where I lived this year, the rooms are suite-style, which means four people share a bathroom and have a kitchen. It's a lot nicer; the rooms are air conditioned and carpeted.

Niche User

Campus Housing: Stay in the AMRs the first year. You'll meet so many more people that way. There's McCoy and Wolman, which are like suites. You really don't meet many people. It's kind of like living in a hotel.

Niche User

Campus Housing: I was in the AMR, and I liked it very much. We were all really close in the building. It was very friendly, and we had fun together.

Niche User

Campus Housing: Avoid Wolman and McCoy as a freshman. You really won't meet people on your floor there. My floor was a big part of my life freshman year, and people in Wolman and McCoy are usually sophomores who already have friends. Buildings A and B are set up suite-style, which some might say makes it harder to meet people. But since they're freshman dorms, people don't know each other. You'll still meet everyone on your floor.

Niche User

Campus Housing: The dorms aren't that bad. As a freshman, you will most likely be living in the AMRs, Buildings A or B, or Wolman Hall. The AMRs are like regular dorms. All are coed except for a wing in AMR I, which is all female, and one in AMR II, which is all male. They have communal bathrooms and smaller rooms. They are the most social places to live, and are generally the best for freshman that want to get to know people. Buildings A and B are suite-style dorms. It is more fun to have a place in Wolman or McCoy sophomore year with three of your friends.

Niche User

Diversity: The campus is pretty diverse. One ethnicity or belief system does not dominate the school. I don't know the exact percentages, but there's a little bit of everything.

Niche User

Diversity: It seems to me like we have students from lots of different countries and a relatively large amount of open-mindedness. But considering the fact that we live in a city with one of the highest percentages of African Americans, they're not well represented at Hopkins.

Niche User

Diversity: A lot of people here complain that we're not diverse enough. There are students here from around the world, but many of them only become friends with people of their nationality. When you look around, there are lots of different homogenous groups, and only a few groups with friends of many ethnicities. Some minorities don't like when white students try to learn about their culture.

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Niche User

Diversity: Hopkins isn't terribly diverse. Hopkins has a large number of international students, but the domestic contingent tends to be mostly white with a decent Asian population, as well. The student body also tends strongly towards upper-middle-class backgrounds.

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Niche User

Diversity: Racially, we're pretty diverse. However, there are still racial cliques, which isn't cool.

Niche User

Diversity: It is a very diverse campus for a college-internationally, racially, and religiously. I'm used to NYC, so nothing is that diverse.

Niche User

Diversity: The campus is diverse, though, it can be segregated. There are many culture clubs that promote diversity. I would say the biggest minorities represented are Indians and Asians-both foreign-born and American. The least represented are probably the Hispanics and African Americans.

Niche User

Diversity: Campus is really diverse. I've met so many different types of people. My freshman year roommate went to a boarding school, my current roommate was from the mountains of New Hampshire, and there were people on my floor from Korea and Turkey. I've met lots of cool and friendly people.

Niche User

Diversity: Hopkins is the most diverse campus you will ever see. No joke. I went to an extremely diverse high school, yet I was amazed when I came here. It's so nice to have different friends who can speak so many different languages, have different views, and cook different foods. You have to mooch off of your ethnic friends here. Don't miss out!

Niche User

Diversity: Diversity is possibly the most defining feature of Hopkins. We have a very diverse population with people from all over the United States and abroad. It's one of my favorite aspects, because people are from all different backgrounds and all so unique.

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Overall ExperienceWhat's This?

Dan White
Hometown
Glen Rock, NJ
Major
International Studies and Economics
Grad Year
2012
View all previous student authors

Students who love Hopkins and students who hate it both recognize that JHU isn’t the school for everyone. Many students believe that classes at JHU are just as hard as Ivy League schools, but they complain that Hopkins professors grade much harder. Many students wish that Hopkins offered grade inflation, as other top schools do, since even people who work hard sometimes end up with low grades. This influences some students to put studying above any social activity, in the hopes of being one of the few people in a class to receive an “A.” Hopkins offers a variety of social programming, but no one forces students to participate, and there’s no one holding your hand and leading you to fun activities. Even though students complain, most say that they’ve enjoyed being challenged by their experiences at Hopkins.

Hopkins presents a well-rounded experience for most students, but not every student takes advantage of the academic, social, and extracurricular opportunities. Some students wish that Hopkins encouraged students to get involved in all aspects of University life, but once you realize that it doesn’t, you can make your own choices about how you want to spend your time. The school’s academic reputation and its state-of-the-art facilities are strong points at Hopkins. Campus housing and food have been improved considerably in recent years with new constructions popping up.

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